California Schools Districts Hope Voters Will Approve Local Bonds For Funding

By Stephen Frank

vialis 40mg arial, see sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;”>Prop. 51 on the November ballot, contrary to the Secretary of States’ explanation is an $18 billion bond–$9 billion for school “construction” and $9 billion to Wall Street.  What is not mentioned, is that before your city gets its share of the money YOU have to tax your people by passing a bond.  For instance, Simi Valley Unified School District misrepresents Measure X—calling it a $239 million bond—that does not include the $239 million that goes to Wall Street—Measure X is a $478 million bond.

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“Proposition 51 would raise $9 billion to build and modernize classrooms.

Nancy Chaires Espinoza is a school board member in Elk Grove Unified, south of Sacramento. She says districts that pass their own school bonds have a better shot at winning state bond funds, too.

She also says, “It’s much harder to persuade your voters to pay for 100 percent of the cost of a local project than it is to say look, if you meet us halfway, we’ll be able to draw down a local match.”

That is right, hard to get folks to pay the full cost of their construction—why not get the people of Ventura to pay 50% of the cost of the construction in Elk Grove, 350 miles away.  Theft by bond?  Everybody gets to lose.  In the end the quality of education is not helped, but the kids get dumbed down education in new facilities.

Walton_High_School_New_Classroom

California Schools Districts Hope Voters Will Approve Local Bonds For Funding

Daniel Potter, Capitol Public Radio,  10/14/16

In nearly 180 school districts around California, voters will decide whether to approve local bonds to fund new classrooms and renovations.

They’re hoping to get matching funds from a statewide school bond also on the November ballot.

Proposition 51 would raise $9 billion to build and modernize classrooms.

Nancy Chaires Espinoza is a school board member in Elk Grove Unified, south of Sacramento. She says districts that pass their own school bonds have a better shot at winning state bond funds, too.

She also says, “It’s much harder to persuade your voters to pay for 100 percent of the cost of a local project than it is to say look, if you meet us halfway, we’ll be able to draw down a local match.”

Bond critics question whether the current system is the most efficient way to pay for school construction. But backers argue schools need billions of dollars in upgrades. Most local bonds require 55 percent of the vote to pass.

 

Originally published in CA Political News

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.


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One Response to California Schools Districts Hope Voters Will Approve Local Bonds For Funding

  1. Tom October 17, 2016 at 3:29 pm

    Proposition 51 allows the state to borrow $9 billion and estimates it will repay $17.6 billion or $1.96 for each dollar borrowed.

    If Simi Valley issues bonds and only pays back $2.00 for each dollar borrowed, they getting a bargain compared to Oxnard.

    Measure D allows the Oxnard School District to borrow $142.5 million and estimates it will repay $478.7 million or $3.36 for each dollar borrowed.

    Reply

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