Guns, Ag Lands and More: G&A Special Report – CA State Legislature – 2017/2018 Session Update

2017/2018 State Legislative Session

Current law prohibits, with some exceptions, openly carrying a handgun or a long gun outside a vehicle while in a public place or on a public street of an incorporated city or city and county, or while in an “prohibited area” where it is unlawful to discharge a firearm. As amended on March 28th, AB 7 – legislation by Assembly Member Mike Gipson (D/64-Carson) – would extend that law to also make it illegal to carry an unloaded long gun in a public “prohibited area” of an unincorporated area of a county.

AB 1527 (Portantino), which passed in 2012, banned openly carrying long guns in incorporated areas – but the legislation did not include unincorporated areas because it was known that people were more likely to be carrying long guns in those areas for sporting or ranching purposes. Proponents of AB 7 argue there are areas within urban areas which are unincorporated – including large unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County that are surrounded by incorporated areas. The intent of AB 7 is to also ban long guns in these areas, referred to as “doughnut holes”.

AB 7 was heard in Assembly Public Safety Committee on March 21st, passing out on a 5 to 2 partisan vote. The bill was then heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 5th, passing out on an 11 to 6 vote. AB 7 passed off the Assembly Floor on April 20th by a 44 to 29 vote, with seven Assembly Members not voting. AB 7 has now moved over to the Senate side, where it has been scheduled to be heard in the Senate Public Safety Committee on Tuesday, June 13th. The hearing will be held in State Capitol Room 3191, and begin at 8:30 a.m.

The Senate Public Safety Committee bill analysis is not yet available. To view the Assembly Public Safety Committee, Assembly Appropriations Committee, or Assembly Floor analyses of AB 7, click AB 7 Assy Analyses

To view all the other information available on AB 7, click AB 7 Gipson

Proposition 117, approved by the California public on June 1990 ballot, enacted “The California Wildlife Protection Act of 1990”, which established that the mountain lion as a specially protected species.  Although the Act made it illegal to hunt mountain lions, it did authorize a person whose livestock or property is being damaged or destroyed by a lion to request a depredation permit from the Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW).

Further, the Act requires that DFW issue the permit if the reported damage is confirmed. As introduced, AB 8 – legislation by Assembly Member Richard Bloom (D/50-Santa Monica) – would change the language of the Act to simply “authorize” DFW to issue the permit, rather than “require” them to.

“The California Wildlife Protection Act of 1990” prohibits the Legislature from changing the language the Act except by a 4/5 vote of the membership of both the Assembly and the Senate.

The bill was set for its first hearing in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee in late March, but the hearing was canceled at the request of the author. The bill was then reset to be heard in Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 25th, but was again pulled from agenda by the author. Assembly Member Bloom is now planning on trying to address his concerns by working with the Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) and stakeholders to discuss possible administrative solutions.

Gaines & Associates will be involved in these discussions and was recently contacted by DFW leadership regarding our attending a meeting to discuss possible administrative options to AB 8, however a date for the meeting still has not yet been scheduled.

 To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee analysis of AB 8, click AB 8 Assy WPW Analysis

To view all the information available on AB 8, click AB 8 Detail

As amended March 28th, AB 472 – legislation authored by Assembly Member Jim Frazier (D/11-Oakley) – would promote wildlife habitat and waterfowl nesting cover on fallowed agricultural lands by strengthening current state policy to encourage non- irrigated cover crops and other natural vegetation on fallowed lands involved with water transfers, so long as the water transfer requirements are met.

Currently, regardless of existing state policy to encourage non-irrigated crops or vegetation on idled lands to provide wildlife habitat, landowners are under pressure from the Department of Water Resources (DWR) to remove all non-irrigated vegetative cover on lands involved with water transfers in order to not impact water available for transfer. AB 472 would help ensure that any requirement by DWR to remove or manipulate that cover is based on scientific data, and accomplished in a way that minimizes impacts to wildlife.

AB 472 would also require DFW to establish an incentive program for landowners who are willing to maintain wildlife cover on fallowed lands, including those involved with a water transfer. The program may provide direct payments to private landowners using available federal funds, state or federal grants, and/or private grants and donations.

AB 472 was heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 4th, passing out on a 13 to 0 bipartisan vote. AB 472 was then briefly heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 26th and quickly placed in the suspense file. The bill was pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on May 26th, passing out on a 17 to 0 vote. On May 31st, AB 472 was brought up for vote on the Assembly Floor, passing off on a unanimous 76 to 0 vote. The bill is now in the Senate, where it will first be heard in the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, but has yet to be scheduled. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee by July 14th  to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, Assembly Appropriations Committee or Assembly Floor analyses of AB 472, click AB 472 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 472, click AB 472 Detail

To view the coalition letter in support of AB 472, click AB 472 Coalition Support

Current law requires every person 16 years of age or older who takes any fish, reptile, or amphibian to obtain a sport fishing license.  As amended March 21st, AB 478 – legislation by Assembly Member Marie Waldron (R/75-Escondido) – would raise the age at which a person is required to purchase a sport fishing license from 16 to 18 years of age or older.

California has suffered a significant decline in the sale of recreational fishing licenses. Part of the decline is attributed to fewer youth choosing to fish as a form of outdoor recreation due to the high cost of licenses. By raising the age requirement for fishing licenses to 18 years old, AB 478 would help get more youth and families involved in fishing by allowing minors to fish for free for an additional two years.

AB 478 was heard in Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on March 21st, passing out on a unanimous 13 to 0 vote. The bill was then brought up briefly in Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 5th, and immediately placed in the “suspense” file due to the bill’s possible fiscal impact to DFW. The bill was not pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee by the May 26th legislative deadline. AB 478 is now a “two-year” bill and cannot be heard until January 2018.

The Assembly Appropriations Committee analysis of AB 478 claims that raising the age at which a person is required to purchase a fishing license from 16 to 18 years old would reduce revenues to the DFW Fish and Game Preservation Fund by $1.55 million annually. In addition, the analysis states that the reduction in license sale revenue could also result in a reduction in future federal revenue to California from the Sport Fish Restoration Act. In 2016, California received $18,053,855 in federal Sport Fish Restoration Act funds, the maximum 5% allowed.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee and the Assembly Appropriations Committee analyses of AB 478, click AB 478 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 478, click AB 478 Detail

 

As amended April 27th, AB 718 – legislation authored by Assembly Member Jim Frazier (D/11-Oakley) – is intended to reduce or eliminate charges currently imposed by mosquito abatement districts for mosquito control on private property managed as wetland habitat. The legislation would authorize private landowners whose wetlands are encumbered by a state or federal conservation easement or protected in perpetuity by state or federal law, and within the boundaries of the Central Valley Joint Venture, to enter into an memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the district to establish a process to implement best management practices (BMPs) which decrease mosquito production, provide net cost savings to the landowner, decrease the application of pesticides, and maintain or enhance the waterfowl habitat values on the property.

AB 718 was originally scheduled for hearing in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 4th, but was pulled from agenda by the author.  The measure was then rescheduled and heard in that committee on April 25th, passing out on a 13 to 1 vote. On May 30th, AB 718 was brought up for vote on the Assembly Floor, passing off with a unanimous 76 to 0 tally. The bill is now in the Senate, where it will first be heard in the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, but has yet to be scheduled. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee by July 14th  to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee and Assembly Floor analyses of AB 718, click AB 718 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 718, click AB 718 Detail

To view the coalition letter in support of AB 718, click AB 718 Coalition Support

  • AB 907 (Garcia) – Office of Outdoor Recreation and Public Lands Enhancement AB 907, legislation by Assembly Member Eduardo Garcia (D/56-Coachella), would establish the Office of Outdoor Recreation and Public Lands Enhancement in the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development. This bill is intended to get California’s public more actively engaged in outdoor recreation, more involved on stewardship of our natural resource issues, and to connect more people of color to the outdoors. The bill would require the Office of Outdoor Recreation and Public Lands Enhancement to create an advisory group to offer advice, expertise, support, and

As amended March 14th, AB 907 expressly defines “outdoor recreation” as a pursuit that occurs in a natural environment or physical landscape, including various active and  passive sports and activities. Although the bill’s text lists numerous outdoor pursuits as examples – including fishing – it fails to list hunting.

AB 907 was heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 4th, passing out on a 11 to 0 vote. The bill was then briefly heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 26th, but with the committee analysis estimating the annual ongoing costs of the proposal at $720,000, it was quickly placed in the suspense file. The bill was not pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee by the May 26th legislative deadline. AB 907 is now a “two-year” bill and cannot be heard until January 2018.

Regardless of the likelihood of the bill’s passage, Gaines & Associates will work with the author’s office and others in the State Legislature to ensure that hunting and hunting opportunity is included in the language and positively promoted to the California public because of this measure – should it ultimately be passed into law.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee and the Assembly Appropriations Committee analyses of AB 907, click AB 907 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 907, click AB 907 Detail

  • AB 986 (Gallagher) – Hunting and Sport Fishing Licenses: Sport Fishing License Duration/Reduced License Fees for Veterans

As amended March 21st, AB 986 – legislation by Assembly Member James Gallagher (R/03-Yuba City) – proposes a variety of changes to California’s hunting and sport fishing licenses.

To begin, AB 986 would change the term of a fishing license from the calendar year to the period of 12 consecutive months beginning on the date of purchase.

AB 986 would also reduce the fee required to obtain an annual or lifetime hunting or fishing license by 25% for a person who is a veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States, was honorably discharged, and is a resident of California.

Further, the bill would also reduce the cost of a sport fishing report card, validation or other entitlement by 25% for a person who is a veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States, was honorably discharged, and is a resident of California, and by 50% for a person who meets those requirements and who also has a 50% or greater service-connected disability.

AB 986 was heard in Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on March 21st, passing out on a unanimous 13 to 0 vote. The bill was then briefly heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 26th, but with DFW estimating annual revenue losses between $4.2 and $15.6 million, along with one-time costs of $866,000 for development and implementation, and $221,000 for increased program staff, the bill was promptly placed in the suspense file.  The bill was not pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly

Appropriations Committee by the May 26th legislative deadline. AB 986 is now a “two- year” bill and cannot be heard until January 2018.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee and the Assembly Appropriations Committee analyses of AB 986, click AB 986 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 986, click AB 986 Detail

As amended on April 5th, AB 1077 – legislation authored by Assembly Member Patrick O’Donnell (D/70-Long Beach) – would extend “The Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Act of 2003” until January 1, 2019, if a report required by the Act is received by the Legislature by January 1, 2018. If the report is not received by the Legislature by January 1, 2018, AB 1077 would sunset the Act on July 1, 2018.

“The Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Act of 2003” provides for the acquisition, operation, and funding of state off-highway vehicle recreation areas and trails; established the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Commission and the Division of Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation within the Department of Motor Vehicles; and provided a grant program for, among other things, acquisition, administration, maintenance, and operation of areas and facilities associated with the use of off-highway motor vehicles.

The Act also imposes a service fee of $7 for the issuance or renewal of identification of off-highway motor vehicles that are subject to identification, along with a special fee of $33 paid at the time of payment of the service fee. These revenues, along with use fees for state vehicular recreation areas and other specified funds, are deposited in the Off- Highway Vehicle Trust Fund and allocated for purposes related to off-highway recreation.

Further, the Act requires revenues from gasoline taxes related to off-highway motor vehicles and off-highway vehicle activities to be transferred monthly from the Motor Vehicle Account to the OHV Trust Fund, according to a calculation performed by the Department of Transportation (DOT), in cooperation with the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). The Act requires DOT to evaluate and revise the estimate of the amount of taxes placed upon the sale of motor vehicle fuel that is used in the operation of off highway vehicles and to provide a report to the Legislature by no later than January 1, 2018.

AB 1077 was heard in the Assembly Rules Committee on March 16th, passing out on a unanimous 9 to 0 vote. The bill was then heard is Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 4th, passing out on a 11 to 0 vote. AB 1077 was then briefly heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on May 3rd, but was placed in the suspense file.

The bill was not pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee by the May 26th legislative deadline. AB 1077 is now a “two-year” bill and cannot be heard until January 2018.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee and the Assembly Appropriations Committee analyses of AB 1077, click AB 1077 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 1077, click AB 1077 Detail

 

AB 1544, legislation co-authored by Assembly Members Brian Dahle (R/01-Bieber) and Devon Mathis (R/26/Visalia), would ensure that hunters can stay in the field and farmers and ranchers can continue to protect their property and livestock as California works to fully phase-in the requirement to use nonlead ammunition when hunting and managing wildlife statewide. AB 1544 is co-sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, California Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation and the California Houndsmen for Conservation with the assistance of Gaines & Associates.

AB 711, legislation passed in 2013, will require the use of nonlead ammunition for the take of all wildlife species statewide as of July 1, 2019. With nonlead ammunition not required for the take of any wildlife (except waterfowl) in any other state except California, the manufacture and availability of nonlead ammunition is currently highly limited in many calibers, and non-existent in others. With demand low due to nonlead ammunition not currently required for most species, nonlead loads in some common calibers can now be found at some California sporting goods retailers. However, when the ban on lead ammunition goes into full effect statewide in July 2019, California’s retailers will have difficulty acquiring adequate supply of nonlead ammunition necessary to meet skyrocketing demand.

Until recently, California’s hunters and ranchers could look to out-of-state retailers to help fill the expected substantial increase in demand for nonlead munitions. However, last year’s approval of proposals governing ammunition sales and purchase will ban internet and mail order purchase of ammunition without the cost-prohibitive step of going through a local retailer as of January 1, 2018, and prohibit most California residents from bringing ammunition purchased out of state into the state without going through a licensed ammunition dealer as of July 1, 2019.  Although the intent of AB 711 may or may not have been to keep law-abiding hunters out of the field, or farmers and ranchers from protecting their property and livestock – when combined with the passage of subsequent proposals which restrict ammunition purchase – AB 711 will do just that.

As amended on March 28th, AB 1544 would address this concern by giving the Fish and Game Commission the authority to “temporarily suspend” the prohibition on the use of lead ammunition for a specific hunting season and caliber, if the Commission finds that nonlead ammunition of a specific caliber is not available for any reason. The bill also would require the Fish and Game Commission to adopt criteria by January 1, 2019 to determine when nonlead ammunition is considered not available, and would require those criteria to include regional availability and the cost of nonlead ammunition. Finally, AB 1544 would prohibit a suspension from remaining in effect for longer than three years.

Although the legislation has sweeping support from hunting and conservation groups, as well as the California Farm Bureau Federation, California Cattlemen’s Association, and the California Wool Growers Association, the bill will face a tough battle at the State Capitol.

Since the bill’s introduction in late February, Gaines & Associates has been working closely with Assembly Members Dahle and Mathis and their staff, the bill’s sponsor organizations, and other partners in conservation to educate Legislators on the critical need for the bill and to build support for its passage. With additional work remaining to be done to secure the necessary votes, we have chosen to make AB 1544 a “two-year” bill to allow these efforts to continue through 2017.

AB 1544 will be first heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee in January 2018.

To view all the information available on AB 1544, click AB 1544 Detail

To view the coalition letter in support of AB 1544, click AB 1544 Coalition Support Ltr

The Department of Fish and Wildlife is currently suffering from a funding shortfall due to, among other things, increasing responsibilities and associated staff costs, combined with declining fishing and hunting license, stamp and tag sale revenues. Historically, the recreational and hunting and sport fishing communities, and to some extent the commercial fishing industry and the General Fund, have funded most of DFW’s fisheries and wildlife management activities.  However, as the state’s population continues to grow, and loss of habitat puts greater stress on all our fishery and wildlife species, more and more of the Department’s activities are directed towards protecting fish and wildlife for the general benefit of the people of the state.

Currently, DFW has an annual operating shortfall of $20 million in its Fish and Game Preservation Fund non-dedicated account. In his January 2017 budget proposal for FY 2017/2018, the Governor proposed to address the annual operating shortfall primarily through increased commercial fishing landing fees, and from a one-time shift of funds from a trust account funded by lifetime hunting and sport fishing licenses.

As amended May 15th, AB 1617 – legislation authored by Assembly Member Richard Bloom (D/50-Santa Monica) – also attempts to take steps towards addressing this funding shortfall. To begin, AB 1617 would require DFW – in cooperation with the Legislature, recreational users, conservation organizations, the commercial fishing industry, and other interested parties – to identify and propose new sources of revenue to fund DFW’s efforts.  But the proposal doesn’t stop there.

Current law required the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency to establish a committee to develop and submit to the Governor and Legislature by July 2012 a “Strategic Vision” for DFW and the Fish and Game Commission for fish and wildlife resource management. In addition, current law required the Governor or that committee to appoint a “blue ribbon” citizen commission or task force, a stakeholder advisory group, and any other group deemed necessary to assist in developing that Strategic Vision. As amended May 15th, AB 1617 would also require the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency to appoint a stakeholder advisory group to report to the Governor and Legislature – before July 1, 2018 – on the progress made toward the implementation of that Strategic Vision. AB 1617 would also require the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency to direct DFW to evaluate and implement program efficiencies as part of its strategic planning effort, and to establish a high-level task force that reviews and makes recommendations regarding Fish and Game Commission and DFW mandates, efficiencies and funding, as called out in the recommendations contained in the Strategic Vision.

AB 1617 was heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee on April 4th, passing out on a 10 to 4 vote. AB 1617 was then briefly heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on May 24th, but was placed in the suspense file. The bill was pulled off suspense and heard in Assembly Appropriations Committee on May 26th, passing out on a 13 to 4 vote. On May 31st, AB 1617 was brought up for vote on the Assembly Floor, passing off on a 56 to 20 vote.  The bill is now in the Senate, where it will first be heard in the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, but has yet to be referred. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee by July 14th  to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife, Assembly Appropriations and Assembly Floor analyses of AB 1617, click AB 1617 Assy Analyses

To view all the information available on AB 1617, click AB 1617 Detail

  • SB 144 (McGuire and Nielsen) – Steelhead Trout: Fishing Report-Restoration Card Current law requires a person taking steelhead trout in inland waters to have a steelhead trout fishing report-restoration card, in addition to their California sport fishing license and any applicable sport license stamp. Existing law also requires fishing report- restoration card revenues be deposited in the DFW Fish and Game Preservation Fund and made available for the monitoring, restoration, and/or enhancement of steelhead trout resources. Further, the law required DFW to report to the Legislature on or before July 1, 2016, regarding the projects undertaken with fishing report-restoration card revenues, the benefits derived, and any recommendations DFW may have for revising the fishing report-restoration card requirement. The law calls for these provisions to become inoperative as of July 1, 2017, and to be repealed as of January 1,

As amended March 15th, SB 144 – legislation co-authored by Senator Mike McGuire (D/02-Healdsburg) and Senator Jim Nielsen (R/04-Gerber) – would extend the operation of the above provisions to July 1, 2022. SB 144 would also require DFW to report to the Legislature regarding the fishing report-restoration card program’s projects on or before July 1, 2021.

SB 144 was heard in Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee on March 14th, passing out on a 9 to 0 unanimous vote. The bill was then briefly heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on April 3rd, but placed in the suspense file. The bill was pulled off suspense and heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on May 25th, passing out on a 7 to 0 vote. On May 31st, SB 144 was brought up for vote on the Senate Floor, passing off with a unanimous 40 to 0 vote. The bill is now in the Assembly, where it will first be heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, but is pending referral. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee by July 14th to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, Senate Appropriations Committee, and/or Senate Floor analyses of SB 144, click SB 144 Senate Analyses

To view all the information available on SB 144, click SB 144 Detail

As amended May 3rd, SB 187 – legislation by Senator Tom Berryhill (R/08-Modesto) – would change the term of a fishing license from the calendar year to the period of 12 consecutive months beginning on the date of purchase. The bill would charge the Fish and Game Commission with adjusting the cost of the license to fully recover all administrative and implementation costs of DFW and the Commission relating to the license.  SB 187 would also require DFW to submit a report to the Legislature by December 1, 2023, regarding the implementation of the new licensing periods and fees. The legislation would go into effect on January 1, 2020.

SB 187 was heard in Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee on April 25th, passing out on a 9 to 0 vote. The bill was then briefly heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on May 15th, and placed in the suspense file. The bill was then pulled off suspense and heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on May 25th, passing out on a 7 to 0 vote. On May 31st, SB 187 was brought up for vote on the Senate Floor, passing off on a unanimous 40 to 0 vote. The bill is now in the Assembly, where it will first be heard in the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, but is pending referral. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee by July 14th to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, Senate Appropriations Committee, and/or Senate Floor analyses of SB 187, click SB 187 Senate Analyses

To view all the information available on SB 187, click SB 187 Detail

As amended March 21st, SB 234 – legislation by Senator Tom Berryhill (R/08-Modesto) – would require the Fish and Game Commission to undertake a survey and evaluation of local ordinances that regulate fishing and to submit the survey and evaluation to the Legislature in a report by December 31, 2018.

SB 234 was heard in Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee on March 14th, passing out on an 8 to 0 unanimous vote. The bill was then heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on April 3rd, passing out on 7 to 0 vote. SB 234 was brought up for vote on the Senate Floor on May 15th, passing off on a 39 to 0 vote. The bill is now on the Assembly side where it is still pending referral to the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee.

To view the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee, Senate Appropriations Committee and Senate Floor analyses of SB 234, click SB 234 Senate Analyses

To view all the information available on SB 234, click SB 234 Detail

Existing law prohibits a person from making more than one application to purchase a handgun within any 30-day period. As amended April 24th, SB 497 – legislation by Senator Anthony J. Portantino (D/25-Glendale) – would extend that prohibition to long guns. The bill would, however, exempt from that prohibition the purchase of a long gun by a person who possesses a valid hunting license and the acquisition of a long gun at an auction or similar event conducted by a non-profit organization.

SB 497 was heard in Senate Public Safety Committee on April 25th, passing out on a 5 to 2 partisan voteThe bill was briefly heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on May 15th, and placed in the suspense file. The bill was then pulled off suspense and heard in Senate Appropriations Committee on May 25th, passing out on a 5 to 2 partisan vote. On May 30th, SB 497 was brought up for vote on the Senate Floor, passing out on a party- line 25 to 13 vote. The bill is now in the Assembly, where it will first be heard in the Assembly Public Safety Committee, but is pending referral. The bill must be heard and passed out of the Assembly Public Safety Committee by July 14th to remain viable in 2017.

To view the Senate Public Safety Committee, Senate Appropriations Committee and Senate Floor analyses of SB 497, click SB 497 Senate Analyses

To view all the information available on SB 487, click SB 497 Detail

 

The California Legislature Outdoor Sporting Caucus was created by California Waterfowl Association and Gaines & Associates staff over ten years ago. Last year, the California Legislature Outdoor Sporting Caucus boasted 33 members of California’s State Legislature – its largest membership ever, and making it one of the largest caucuses at our State Capitol. For more information on the California Legislature Outdoor Sporting Caucus, click Outdoor Sporting Caucus


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